Crew Overboard Prevention: How to Remain Aboard

Following these rules can prevent virtually all man-overboard incidents: 1. Remain sober, especially if you expect to go on deck for any reason. 2. Wear non-skid footwear when working on deck and have nonskid paint or pads in critical work areas. 3. Walk or crawl on the uphill windward side in a crouched position with…Read More

Long Range Planning for Your Sailing Organization

Clay Deutsch, CEO and President of Boston Private Financial Holdings, presents "Long Range Planning for Your Organization" at the US Sailing Leadership Forum 2014. Power Point PresentationRead More

Weather Forecasting: Thunderstorms and Squalls

by Stan Honey and Ken Campbell There are three types of squalls/thunderstorms: those associated with a cold front or low pressure area, the “air mass” thunderstorm, and trade wind squalls. Cold front thunderstorms develop along the leading edge of a cold front. Remember, the cold front brings a wind shift from the south or southwest…Read More

Sharing the Seas: Safe Boating for Sailors and Whales

Did you know that collision with vessels is one of the leading causes of death among whales, such as the endangered North Atlantic right whale? Collisions can also cause thousands of dollars in damage to boats and injure crew. US Sailing, the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, New Bedford Whaling Museum and Whale and Dolphin…Read More

Dave Perry’s Racing Rules: Quiz 23

Quiz 23 Boats W (a windward boat) and L (a leeward boat) are reaching towards the gybe mark. L becomes overlapped with W from clear astern. They are both sailing proper courses and are on a collision course. As they near each other, W hails, “You came from clear astern and I’m on my proper…Read More

Case Study: An Emergency Action Plan Report from OCSC

When a Life Hangs in the Balance – Emergency at the Club By: Rich Jepsen and Steve SaulAll sailing instructors and program directors are trained in the ‘what ifs’ of safety and risk in our jobs teaching kids and adults how to sail, while providing them opportunities to enjoy their new found skills.We all know…Read More

Speed & Smarts: In light air, go for better pressure

by David Dellenbaugh When you’re racing in light air, a three-knot increase in wind velocity might improve your boat speed by 30% or 40% (and you will point higher, too). But in heavy air, the same wind increase might improve your speed only 5% to 10% (and it probably won’t help your pointing). What this…Read More

Adaptive Sailing: Building a program

By: Cristina Rubke, Maureen McKinnon, Betsy Alison, and Joe Harris In this US Sailing Leadership Forum presentation, you will learn about adaptive facilities, equipment, designs, staff training tips, recruitment, resources and funding.Why Adaptive Sailing?• Creates a positive difference in many lives• Increases your membership and outreach base• Increases access to funding opportunities• Creates new Partnership…Read More

Top 10 Reasons to Sail a Catamaran

10. Fast is fun. Multihulls are fast. Average upwind speeds near 10 knots are common, and downwind at 15-20 knots is easy. 9. Stability is relaxing. The ability to park and “chillax” is a great trait of multihulls. 8. Fewer collisions. Because the collisions have high consequences there are very few. 7. Kinetics don’t work.…Read More

Implementing an Offshore Safety and Preparedness Plan

By: Chuck Hawley & Sally Lindsay HoneyHere are some items to consider when creating and implementing an offshore safety and preparedness plan:1. Start with a safety ethos for the event2. Implement pre-departure training3. Select an equipment list4. Identify skipper/crew/yacht qualifications, if any5. Pre-departure inspections – make them useful6. Communication plan appropriate for the event7. Emergency…Read More