Bareboat Cruising: Selecting a charter company

As a potential customer, you can contact several charter companies to determine the best service for your charter requirements. Ask friends who have used the companies you're considering for their opinions. Look for professional practices and a business-like attitude at all levels of contact. Make sure that you have a complete understanding of the financial arrangements.…Read More

Basic Cruising: The bilge system

Never let the bilge be "out of sight, out of mind." A regular visual inspection of the bilge should become a habit. You will quickly learn what is normal water in the bilge - rainwater coming down the mast, ice box drainage, and the drip from the stuffing box - and recognize water that indicates…Read More

Sharing the Seas: Safe Boating for Sailors and Whales

Did you know that collision with vessels is one of the leading causes of death among whales, such as the endangered North Atlantic right whale? Collisions can also cause thousands of dollars in damage to boats and injure crew. US Sailing, the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, New Bedford Whaling Museum and Whale and Dolphin…Read More

Jib and Mainsail Trim: How Telltales Work

Sail trim is one of the most important skills in sailing, but because the wind is invisible, it can sometimes be difficult to judge whether your sails are trimmed properly. A very helpful way to detect wind flow around your sails (and adjust your sails or change course accordingly), is with telltales. How Telltales Work…Read More

Five Basic Navigation Rules for Sailing Situations

Courtesy on the water makes sailing more fun for everyone. But beyond courtesy, there are Navigation Rules - like traffic laws - that can be enforced by authorities. Navigation Rules help prevent accidents and apply to the smallest rowboat and the largest tanker. Less experienced sailors should stay clear of boating traffic and sail defensively.…Read More

The Powerboat Certification Series: Towing Concepts

These towing concepts are from US Sailing's Safety, Rescue & Support Boat Handling. Observer: There should be a person on the safety-rescue boat who watches the tow and alerts the operator if any problems develop. This person will tend the towline and transmit information to the operator while picking up or releasing a tow. Speed…Read More