Rules/Officiating

Dave Perry’s 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes

Quiz 3

Question
Answer

Question:

Boat Q, a doublehanded trapeze boat, wins the race. On shore, Q is listed as OCS on the score sheet. Q makes a scoring request to the race committee and is told that, though her hull was not over the starting line, her crew’s head and shoulders were on the course side of the starting line when she went out on the trapeze seconds before the starting signal. Q requests redress.

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 10

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Answer

Question:

Boats P (on port tack) and S (on starboard tack) are beating to windward. P tacks into a position just in front of S. When P reaches a close-hauled course, she is a few feet clear ahead of S. S, who has not needed to change course prior to that moment to avoid P, immediately luffs above a close-hauled course, avoids contact and protests.

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 12

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Answer

Question:

With 30 seconds to go before the starting signal, Boat P (on port tack) on a beam reach, is approaching Boat S (on starboard tack) who is on a close-hauled course. P proceeds to luff and then cross head to wind all in one motion, ending up to leeward of S. Just after P passes head to wind she holds her course, telling S to keep clear because she is on starboard tack and a leeward boat. S luffs to avoid contact with P and protests. You are on the protest committee; how would you decide this?

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 14

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Answer

Question:

Thirty seconds before the starting signal, Boat W is nearly wayless, her sails flapping. About one length prior to becoming overlapped to leeward, Boat L hails, “Leeward boat!” W takes no evasive action. One second after L becomes overlapped to leeward of W, L has to bear away to avoid contact with W. W begins trimming her sails and heading up immediately after the overlap is established. L protests. The protest committee finds that W, having been given adequate warning of the impending situation, fails to keep clear of a leeward boat, thereby breaking rule 11, On the Same Tack, Overlapped. W appeals. You are on the appeals committee; how would you decide this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 15

Question
Answer

Question:

Two 25-foot boats, L (a leeward boat) and W (a windward boat), are approaching the right-hand end of the starting line, a 30-foot powerboat, to start an upwind leg. Both boats are beam reaching, with L on a course to pass one length to leeward of the race committee boat. Twenty seconds before the starting signal and when two lengths from the race committee boat, L hails, “No room! Don’t go in there!” to W. Both boats hold their courses until W is overlapped to leeward of the race committee boat. At that point L luffs and W makes con- tact nearly simultaneously with both L and the committee boat. There is dam- age to the starboard side of L but not serious damage. Both boats protest each other. You are on the protest committee; how would you decide this?

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 22

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Answer

Question:

Boats W (a windward boat) and L (a leeward boat) are reaching towards the gybe mark on converging courses. L becomes overlapped with W from clear astern within two of her lengths of W. They are both sailing proper courses and are on a collision course. As they near each other, W hails, “You came from clear astern and I’m on my proper course.” L replies, “I’m on my proper course.” W’s boom then touches L with no damage or injury and both protest.

 

You are on the protest committee; how would you decide this?

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 24

Question
Answer

Question:

Two 18-foot boats, L (a leeward boat) and W (a windward boat), are approaching the left-hand end of the starting line, which is a 16-foot powerboat. When W is three lengths from the end of the line, L becomes overlapped on W to leeward from clear astern. There are six seconds to go before the starting signal. L slowly luffs and W keeps clear. As L reaches close-hauled, the starting signal is made. L is a boat length from the powerboat and will not clear it sailing close-hauled. She luffs to head to wind, shooting up and around the powerboat, and then bears away to a close-hauled course. W keeps clear through- out, and protests L for sailing above close-hauled after the starting signal.

 

You are on the protest committee: how would you decide this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 83

Question
Answer

Question:

In a post-race conversation, the helmsman of Boat X complains to a member of the protest committee that he clearly saw another boat in his race, Boat Y, touch the gybe mark and not take a penalty turn.  The protest committee member therefore decides to protest Y for an alleged breach of rule 31, Touching a Mark.  Y is informed that she is being protested, and the protest is filed within the time limit.

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 86

Question
Answer

Question:

During the hearing of a request for redress, the protest committee learns that Boat X has touched a mark during the race. The protest committee protests X, giving her time to prepare, etc., holds a protest hearing with X in attendance, and disqualifies her for breaking rule 31, Touching a Mark. X appeals. You are on the appeals committee; how would you decide this?

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 90

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Answer

Question:

After a race held in the United States, Boat X requests redress claiming that the leeward mark was out of position. The notice of race and sailing instructions make no mention of the US Sailing prescriptions to the rules. The protest committee posts on the official notice board that Boat X has requested redress, and the time and place of the hearing. The skipper of Boat Y asks the protest committee if he can sit in on the hearing, and is told no. However the protest committee calls him to give evidence as a witness. The protest committee decides that the mark was out of position and abandons the race. Boat Y is not a party to the hearing, so her representative cannot appeal (see rule 70.1(a), Appeals and Requests to a National Authority). However the protest committee requests confirmation or correction of its procedures and decisions under rule 70.2, Appeals and Requests to a National Authority.

 

You are on the protest committee: how do you decide this?

 

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.

 

Quiz 97

Question
Answer

Question:

Boat P (on port tack) is running downwind and on a parallel course with a dock less than one length away. Boat S (on starboard tack) is fast approaching P from clear astern and hails, “Starboard!” Approximately five seconds later, S makes minor contact with P’s transom (no damage or injury) and protests.

 

You are on the protest committee; how would you decide this?

 

This quiz was excerpted from Dave Perry's 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes available from US Sailing. For a comprehensive explanation of the rules, read Dave Perry's Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2024, which is also available from US Sailing. Permission to reprint this quiz for non commercial use is granted by the author.