How to Hydrate Your Athlete If They Don’t Like Water

This article is brought to by US Sailing in partnership with TrueSport If you have a picky athlete who doesn’t love the taste of water, or just one who’s constantly on the go and bad at remembering to regularly sip from a water bottle, it can be tricky to make sure that he or she…Read More

Capturing Sailors using Social Media

By Jess Haverstock and Cindy Moen of Lake Minnetonka Sailing School Social media platforms are powerful promotional tools for sailing schools, yacht clubs and sailing organizations to reach the sailing audience. Sure, you have a Facebook page. Okay, you are on Instagram. Now how do you positively and meaningfully engage with your audiences to reinforce…Read More

Ask Kids What They Want

By John Pearce and Ariana Smaldone On Saturday, February 2nd youth sailors Will Levy, Mallory Edwards, and Sydney Monahan, ages 16, 17, and 18 respectively, took command of a room full of sailing leaders at the National Sailing Program Symposium (NSPS) in Jacksonville, Florida. Their panel discussion, titled “Ask Kids What They Want,” took place…Read More

Dear Youth Sailors… Sincerely, College Sailing

by Tyler Colvin, Assistant Sailing Coach, Old Dominion University Dear Youth Sailors, Welcome to college sailing in 2019. While college sailing has a long and storied history, as a sport, it has grown and changed drastically in the last 20 years. However, the popular perceptions of college sailing and the college admissions process haven’t necessarily…Read More

Reviving Your Regional Youth Racing

By Andrew Nelson Andrew Nelson, Youth Sailing Director at The Sailing Foundation in Redmond, Washington, has found success in revitalizing regular youth racing in the Pacific Northwest. Here he shares some lessons and practical advice for others looking to grow the sport in their area. In fall of 2014, I began managing the Northwest Youth…Read More

Teaching Fundamentals: Stress Management

Stress gradually takes its toll when an instructor feels overwhelmed by job pressures. Frequent pressing deadlines, long hours, conflicts, high expectations, insufficient resources, emergencies, sudden setbacks, financial constraints, and preoccupying personal problems are only a few of the things instructors may face every day which contribute to stress. Stress management is particularly important during a…Read More

Speed & Smarts: In heavy air, play the shifts

By David Dellenbaugh When you’re sailing in a lot of breeze, your boat is usually overpowered. Because of this, finding more wind velocity probably won’t help you go much faster or point higher. In fact, in some cases a strong puff might even slow you down. A good wind shift, on the other hand, can…Read More

Dave Perry’s Racing Rules: Quiz 23

Quiz 23 Boats W (a windward boat) and L (a leeward boat) are reaching towards the gybe mark. L becomes overlapped with W from clear astern. They are both sailing proper courses and are on a collision course. As they near each other, W hails, “You came from clear astern and I’m on my proper…Read More

Speed & Smarts: In light air, go for better pressure

by David Dellenbaugh When you’re racing in light air, a three-knot increase in wind velocity might improve your boat speed by 30% or 40% (and you will point higher, too). But in heavy air, the same wind increase might improve your speed only 5% to 10% (and it probably won’t help your pointing). What this…Read More

Lake Sailing Tips

By Richard Feeny, US Sailing Junior National Coach, Finger Lakes Junior Laser Champion Introduction The shape of the land to windward of the race course will affect the wind. The first thing to look for is any low area that will let the wind onto the race course. In a flat country with no valleys…Read More