Weather Forecasting: Know your lows

By Stan Honey and Ken Campbell There are three major types of lows: tropical lows, mid-latitude lows, and cut-off lows. It is important to understand the differences between them. Tropical lows live in the belt of tradewinds, and are also known as tropical depressions, tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons. They are seasonal and travel east

Hypothermia and Heat Emergencies

Sailors are often exposed to extreme conditions. During these cold winter days during Frostbite racing, or on hot sunny days with no wind, or rainy days with too much wind, or prolonged exposure to wind and spray… all of the things that make sailing challenging and fun can sneak up on you if you do
Being safety conscious at all times, both on and off the water, is an attitude you will develop with your instructor’s help. It will pay off many times over in safe, fun, relaxing sailing. Safety encompasses many things: dressing properly, wearing a life jacket, being courteous toward other boaters, being observant, sailing by the “rules
Wind speed and direction never stay the same – they are constantly changing. While these changes are often small and subtle, they can be substantial. You will, with experience, develop a skill called wind sensing or wind feel which helps you detect the wind and anticipate its changes. How can you tell the direction of

How to Read Wind & Weather Patterns

By: Nick Turney of North Sails Learn how to read wind on a course and make appropriate tactical decisions to improve your performance on the water. Reading the wind, includes: types of puffs; reading the puffs and; predicting the wind. Predicting the wind, includes: data collection; weather maps and; isobar maps. Reading Wind & Weather

Trim for Waves

By: Bill Gladstone, Director of North U and author of the North U Racing Trim, North U Racing Tactics, and North U Cruising and Seamanship books and discs.  Each sail has three sources of power: angle of attack, depth, and twist. Proper trim means sailing at full power and with the proper mix of power. For a

Distance Racing Fundamentals

By: Bill Gladstone, Director of North U and author of the North U Racing Trim, North U Racing Tactics, and North U Cruising and Seamanship books and discs. When racing distances, there are several tactics to keep in mind: aim toward the finish line; sail fast and hard; keep your eye on the weather and; practice at
Before you leave the charter dock, check the weather prediction for the next few days. Local weather stations will carry up-to-date information. Rapid and/or large barometric pressure movements usually indicate major changes in the weather. East Coast East Coast weather patterns change constantly as the continental land mass reconfigures passing weather fronts. Cool Canadian highs
by Stan Honey and Ken Campbell There are three types of squalls/thunderstorms: those associated with a cold front or low pressure area, the “air mass” thunderstorm, and trade wind squalls. Cold front thunderstorms develop along the leading edge of a cold front. Remember, the cold front brings a wind shift from the south or southwest
Following these rules can prevent virtually all man-overboard incidents: 1. Remain sober, especially if you expect to go on deck for any reason. 2. Wear non-skid footwear when working on deck and have nonskid paint or pads in critical work areas. 3. Walk or crawl on the uphill windward side in a crouched position with