Man Overboard Recovery Procedure

Written by Peter Isler, with additional contributions by Chuck Hawley and Michael Jacobs “Man Overboard” is probably the third most famous nautical hail, after “Land Ho” and “Thar She Blows,” but it is by far the most serious and potentially life threatening of the three. Man Overboard Recovery Procedure Although we should keep in mind
Tagged under: , , , ,
The US Sailing Judges Manual is updated every four years in conjunction with each revision of the Racing Rules of Sailing. This information is a part of Regatta Operations and organizing a Protest Committee. Each Protest Committee (PC) must have a chair to act as presiding officer and spokesperson. When it is necessary for the
Tagged under: , ,

Building Race Management Resources

By: Jenn Lancaster, Race Director, Newport Harbor Yacht Club / Lynn M. Lynch, On-the-Water Director, Chicago Yacht Club / Taran Teague, Annapolis Yacht Club Building race management resources at your club or sailing center requires a significant commitment. Investing time, effort and money in these resources can go a long way in positively impacting sailors’
Tagged under: , , ,
Did you know that collision with vessels is one of the leading causes of death among whales, such as the endangered North Atlantic right whale? Collisions can also cause thousands of dollars in damage to boats and injure crew. US Sailing, the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, New Bedford Whaling Museum and Whale and Dolphin
By: Donald Wilson, Founder Chicago Match Race Center With so many integral elements to consider, running a successful match race can be both challenging and extremely rewarding. When a well-run regatta is executed with great talent and a lot of racing, all the participants want to return, including competitors, umpires, and volunteers. Don Wilson, founder

What Makes Classes Strong?

Paul Young, President of Rondar UK, gave a presentation entitled “What Makes Classes Strong” at US Sailing’s One-Design Symposium at Bay Head Yacht Club last fall. Rondar has earned a reputation as a pre-eminent builder of fast one-design race boats. Rondar hulls have won world championships in the Contender, the 420, the Fireball, the Enterprise
Tagged under: , , , ,

Keeping Regattas Fun

By: Jake Fish, Communications Manager, US Sailing Many attendees of the Sailing Leadership Forum expressed the desire for more variety in our race courses with fewer windward/leeward courses and more non-traditional regattas. Attendees emphasized the importance of growth in participation and sportsmanship, especially for youth. Regatta organizers were challenged to create more alternative courses, games
When you’re trying to teach sportsmanship in competitive sailing, there are no proven methods to follow. You need to try different approaches because every group you teach will react differently to the request to “act sportsmanlike.” Practice sessions can fall apart if your team isn’t getting along and all you can is, “Will you please
By: Jessica M. Mohler, Psy.D., CC-AASPClinical and Sport PsychologistUnited States Naval AcademyI am sure you have experienced this before: two sailors de-rigging at the end of the day, one has a smile on his face and seems excited about how he did on the water, the other appears upset as you hear him saying to
Tagged under: , , ,
By: David Dellenbaugh  This sounds simple, but it’s not always so easy to do. A strategy is your game plan for how to sail fast up the first beat, a guideline to keep you going the right way. It’s not so difficult to develop a strategic plan – you just have to get out to the
Tagged under: ,
 By: David Dellenbaugh  This is a sure-fire rule of thumb that works in any wind condition. Of course, you must be able to predict which way the wind will shift next. But if you can do this, all you have to do is sail in that direction and you will come out ahead (assuming you
Tagged under: ,
 By: Dave Perry, Chairman of US Sailing Appeals Committee Dave Perry presented the dos and don’ts of filing an appeal at the Sailing Leadership Forum last February in San Diego. Perry is the author of Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing and Dave Perry’s 100 Best Racing Rules Quizzes. He is also a US Sailing Senior Certified Judge. When filing
Tagged under: , , ,
By: David Dellenbaugh  When you want to go fast upwind, bad air is your enemy. So watch out for other boats, and look ahead for lanes of clear air. Wind shadows extend farther and slow you more in light air than they do in heavy air. So when there’s not much wind, don’t stay in
Tagged under: ,

The Art of Rig Tune & Bend

By: Nick Turney of North Sails Prepared for the 2011 US Sailing One Design Symposium, this hands-on seminar will show you the proper steps of tuning a mast and also how to use mast bend to your advantage. These steps will assist in boosting performance and improving safety. The Art of Rig Tune & Bend
Tagged under: ,

How to Read Wind & Weather Patterns

By: Nick Turney of North Sails Learn how to read wind on a course and make appropriate tactical decisions to improve your performance on the water. Reading the wind, includes: types of puffs; reading the puffs and; predicting the wind. Predicting the wind, includes: data collection; weather maps and; isobar maps. Reading Wind & Weather
Tagged under: , ,
By: David Dellenbaugh  When you’re not sure where the next shift will come from, get onto the longer tack to the windward mark (the tack on which your bow is pointing closer to the mark). This is one of my most reliable strategies. Sailing the longer tack works because of probability. Your chances of success
Tagged under: ,

Sail Trim & Shape

by: Nick Turney of North Sails Learn the ins and outs of sail trim and how rigging and tuning affect the shape of your sails. The Mainsail Trim includes: Main Sheet, Traveler; Cunningham; Outhaul and; Vang. The Headsail & Spin Trim includes: Jib Lead; Jib Halyard and; Jib Sheet.  Mainsail Trim  Headsail & Spin Trim
Tagged under: , ,

Racing Tactics & Strategy

By: Nick Turney of North Sails Gaining information about the race course and your competition will help you gain an advantage. Then, learn the tactics to position your boat to implement your strategy. Racing Tactics & Strategy
Tagged under: , , ,

When to Split Tacks

By: Bill Gladstone, Director of North U and author of the North U Racing Trim, North U Racing Tactics, and North U Cruising and Seamanship books and discs.  When to Split Tacks: You know the old adage: “Can’t catch ‘em if we follow ‘em.” So, when you are behind you’ve got to split tacks to catch
Tagged under: ,

Trim for Waves

By: Bill Gladstone, Director of North U and author of the North U Racing Trim, North U Racing Tactics, and North U Cruising and Seamanship books and discs.  Each sail has three sources of power: angle of attack, depth, and twist. Proper trim means sailing at full power and with the proper mix of power. For a
Tagged under: , , ,