Courtesy on the water makes sailing more fun for everyone. But beyond courtesy, there are Navigation Rules – like traffic laws – that can be enforced by authorities. Navigation Rules help prevent accidents and apply to the smallest rowboat and the largest tanker. Less experienced sailors should stay clear of boating traffic and sail defensively.
Once you know the basics of sailing, you should learn a few seamanship skills. Good seamanship helps you handle situations even when you’re not sailing. Your boat may need to be towed for some reason. You may need to paddle from a dock to a mooring. And, of course, there are specific knots for specific
Sail trim is one of the most important skills in sailing, but because the wind is invisible, it can sometimes be difficult to judge whether your sails are trimmed properly. A very helpful way to detect wind flow around your sails (and adjust your sails or change course accordingly), is with telltales. How Telltales Work

Getting In and Out of Irons

“Being in irons” describes a boat that is stopped. While pointing into the No-Go Zone, the sails will be luffing. You will not be able to steer normally. On a boat with a jib you can turn the bow away from the wind by backing the jib. To back the jib, hold it out to

Quick-Stop Rescue

All sailors must know how to react quickly to a crew overboard situation. The hallmark of the Quick-Stop Rescue method is the immediate reduction of boat speed by turning in a direction to windward and thereafter maneuvering at modest speed, remaining near the PIW. This rescue requires these steps: 1) As soon as a crew
Wind speed and direction never stay the same – they are constantly changing. While these changes are often small and subtle, they can be substantial. You will, with experience, develop a skill called wind sensing or wind feel which helps you detect the wind and anticipate its changes. How can you tell the direction of
Each charter destination offers its own special aspects. You may have nursed a life-long fantasy to loll on a snow-white beach in Tahiti or climb the ruins of the Parthenon. Advance research will inform you how to fulfill those dreams or where to go for new adventures. Travel books, boating magazines and charter company brochures
By: Rob Crafa and Lynn Lynch There are so many benefits for hosting and taking US Powerboating’s Safe Powerboat Handling Course. Find out how this course can improve the quality of your club’s programming: Hands-on, on-the-water–, practical application of all skills Professional textbook & online / digital teaching aids Boaters with no experience quickly gain confidence

The Art of Rig Tune & Bend

By: Nick Turney of North Sails Prepared for the 2011 US Sailing One Design Symposium, this hands-on seminar will show you the proper steps of tuning a mast and also how to use mast bend to your advantage. These steps will assist in boosting performance and improving safety. The Art of Rig Tune & Bend

Top 10 Reasons to Sail a Catamaran

10. Fast is fun. Multihulls are fast. Average upwind speeds near 10 knots are common, and downwind at 15-20 knots is easy. 9. Stability is relaxing. The ability to park and “chillax” is a great trait of multihulls. 8. Fewer collisions. Because the collisions have high consequences there are very few. 7. Kinetics don’t work.