WATCH: Atlantic Cup Kids Day

Kids learn about ocean conservation from Sailors for the Sea, how to tie knots, climb the mast, the day in the life of a sailor, and much more at Atlantic Cup Kids Day in Charleston, SC. Watch the video courtesy of the Atlantic Cup, presented by 11th Hour Racing.
Learn about the fun and excitement of sailing, safety at sea and the environment by downloading the education guides from the Atlantic Cup, presented by 11th Hour Racing. Explore water, land, and sea and how they interact while gaining respect for the for the world around us and learn more from Atlantic Cup Kids.
By: Jessica M. Mohler, Psy.D., CC-AASPClinical and Sport PsychologistUnited States Naval AcademyJessica Mohler is a clinical and sports psychologist, and a sailing mom too. In this article, Mohler provides an interesting outlook on parenting youth athletes from a sailing perspective and makes recommendations that will help you build a strong foundation for your youth sailor.I

Man Overboard Recovery Procedure

Written by Peter Isler, with additional contributions by Chuck Hawley and Michael Jacobs “Man Overboard” is probably the third most famous nautical hail, after “Land Ho” and “Thar She Blows,” but it is by far the most serious and potentially life threatening of the three. Man Overboard Recovery Procedure Although we should keep in mind

Weather Forecasting: Know your lows

By Stan Honey and Ken Campbell There are three major types of lows: tropical lows, mid-latitude lows, and cut-off lows. It is important to understand the differences between them. Tropical lows live in the belt of tradewinds, and are also known as tropical depressions, tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons. They are seasonal and travel east

Hypothermia and Heat Emergencies

Sailors are often exposed to extreme conditions. During these cold winter days during Frostbite racing, or on hot sunny days with no wind, or rainy days with too much wind, or prolonged exposure to wind and spray… all of the things that make sailing challenging and fun can sneak up on you if you do
These towing concepts are from US Sailing’s Safety, Rescue & Support Boat Handling. Observer: There should be a person on the safety-rescue boat who watches the tow and alerts the operator if any problems develop. This person will tend the towline and transmit information to the operator while picking up or releasing a tow. Speed
Being safety conscious at all times, both on and off the water, is an attitude you will develop with your instructor’s help. It will pay off many times over in safe, fun, relaxing sailing. Safety encompasses many things: dressing properly, wearing a life jacket, being courteous toward other boaters, being observant, sailing by the “rules

Annapolis Accident Review

By: John Rousmaniere A chain of small events quickly evolved into something very rare in sailing – a tragedy. The wind and waves were not excessive, the sailors were competent, and the boat was a standard model of a long-popular class. Yet a routine capsize rapidly developed into the drowning death of a much beloved

Preparing Your Safety Boat

Safety Boat Procedures For Sailing Regattas by Rick Bischoff Whether is it a man, woman or child who is in danger on the water during a regatta, it is the duty of the Race Committee to be ready to help. It is very important to establish procedures involving safety and rescue of persons participating in

Regatta Operations: A Jury Secretary

The operation of the Protest Committee (PC) at a large or busy regatta can be significantly enhanced with the aid of a competent jury secretary. A good jury secretary is usually an experienced judge or someone with PC experience. Before coming to the event, the jury chair should review the procedures that are regularly used by a jury
The US Sailing Judges Manual is updated every four years in conjunction with each revision of the Racing Rules of Sailing. This information is a part of Regatta Operations and organizing a Protest Committee. Each Protest Committee (PC) must have a chair to act as presiding officer and spokesperson. When it is necessary for the
Anderson Reggio, Ken Legler, and Forrest Gay present “Race Officials at a Youth Event Safe, Fair and Fun!” at the 2014 US Sailing Leadership Forum. Accompanying Power Point  
Courtesy on the water makes sailing more fun for everyone. But beyond courtesy, there are Navigation Rules – like traffic laws – that can be enforced by authorities. Navigation Rules help prevent accidents and apply to the smallest rowboat and the largest tanker. Less experienced sailors should stay clear of boating traffic and sail defensively.
Once you know the basics of sailing, you should learn a few seamanship skills. Good seamanship helps you handle situations even when you’re not sailing. Your boat may need to be towed for some reason. You may need to paddle from a dock to a mooring. And, of course, there are specific knots for specific
Sail trim is one of the most important skills in sailing, but because the wind is invisible, it can sometimes be difficult to judge whether your sails are trimmed properly. A very helpful way to detect wind flow around your sails (and adjust your sails or change course accordingly), is with telltales. How Telltales Work

Getting In and Out of Irons

“Being in irons” describes a boat that is stopped. While pointing into the No-Go Zone, the sails will be luffing. You will not be able to steer normally. On a boat with a jib you can turn the bow away from the wind by backing the jib. To back the jib, hold it out to

Quick-Stop Rescue

All sailors must know how to react quickly to a crew overboard situation. The hallmark of the Quick-Stop Rescue method is the immediate reduction of boat speed by turning in a direction to windward and thereafter maneuvering at modest speed, remaining near the PIW. This rescue requires these steps: 1) As soon as a crew
Wind speed and direction never stay the same – they are constantly changing. While these changes are often small and subtle, they can be substantial. You will, with experience, develop a skill called wind sensing or wind feel which helps you detect the wind and anticipate its changes. How can you tell the direction of

Building Race Management Resources

By: Jenn Lancaster, Race Director, Newport Harbor Yacht Club / Lynn M. Lynch, On-the-Water Director, Chicago Yacht Club / Taran Teague, Annapolis Yacht Club Building race management resources at your club or sailing center requires a significant commitment. Investing time, effort and money in these resources can go a long way in positively impacting sailors’